Art-Mob at VanDusen Gardens, Feb. 23, 12-2 PM, $7.75 admission

This is not a typical cultural event, but it definitely is one!

‘Art-Mob’ VanDusen Gardens… and be inspired by ‘A Walk in the Forest’

Saturday, February 23, 2013; 12pm to 2pm 
Location: VanDusen Gardens

Full info: awalkintheforest2013.blogspot.ca

Art-Mob VanDusen Gardens

The Park Board wants to demolish ‘A Walk in the Forest’, the 1976 modernist pavilion built by MacMillan-Bloedel as a forest education centre. We think it’s inspirational, beautiful and reusable.

Bring your sketchbook, camera, musical instrument or dancing shoes and be inspired by this remarkable building and its magial forest setting. Help us convince the Park Board that it’s too valuable to lose. Imagine new uses for it! Create a piece of artwork to celebrate it!

Directions: enter VanDusen Gardens through the Vistor Centre at 5251 Oak St. near 37th (admission: adults $7.75; youth & seniors $5.75). Walk straight out into the garden, angling to the right, and follow the signs for ‘Forest Centre,’ ‘Education Centre’ or Toilets.

The event is in partnership with Heritage Vancouver Society.

Media contact: Michael Kluckner ( 604 251 3353) or mkluckner@gmail.com

(Not surprisingly, this campaign is not endorsed by the Park Board or VanDusen Garden.)

The building known as the Education Centre (also the Forest Education Centre) is a modernist masterpiece lost in the forest of an untended section of VanDusen Garden. Built in 1976, it was originally known as MacMillan-Bloedel Place, named for its donor, the largest forestry company in what was then the largest industry in British Columbia. Its unique educational displays, including a 50-seat theatre, were called “A Walk in the Forest.”

Architect Paul Merrick, working then as chief designer for Thompson, Berwick & Pratt, set the pavilion into a small hill on the edge of a lake in the northwest part of the gardens. Its green roof was one of the first in the city, and its unique internal columns used some of the finest wood in British Columbia. It won the Canadian Architect Yearbook Award of Excellence Award in 1974, and was constructed by Halse-Martin of Vancouver. It was once an object of pride for the city, VanDusen Garden and the Park Board.

 

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